Megiddo – The Past, Present, & Future Of All Humanity

Tel Megiddo

Looking out over the valley from on top of Tel Megiddo

Situated in a strategic location in the Jezreel Valley, the city of Megiddo controlled the most important crossroads of the ancient world.  Consequently, its history has been one of battles and warfare as the nations of men struggled for power, wealth, and dominion. From the battle between Thutmose III and the Canaanite Coalition in the 15th century to the battle between the Allied forces led by General Allenby against the Ottoman army during World War I, there has been much bloodshed spilt in this valley, and many important battles fought.  Yet, despite of its historical significance to the past, the fame of Megiddo is due largely to its role in the future and the events to come.  It is here that the Apostle John foresaw the final conflict between rebellious man and Almighty God.  The outcome of this battle, which ultimately will usher in eternity, will prove forever God’s sovereign power and dominion over all the realms of men.

And he gathered them together into a place called in the Hebrew tongue Armageddon. Revelation 16:16

The archeological excavations here at Megiddo are some of the best in all of Israel, and they involve 25 different layers. We saw the gates of the city built by Solomon, and we walked through a tunnel, carved out of rock during the time of Ahab, to get to the city’s water source.  There was an ancient altar here that has also been excavated. But by far, the most exciting thing about Megiddo is the breath-taking view that the city has of the Valley of Jezreel. It is much broader, wider, and longer than I had ever imagined, and from its lookout, you could see Mount Carmel, Mount Tabor, Nazareth, and many other Biblical places. The feeling one has while standing here is quite surreal because here, more than any other place in the world, is where the past (25 layers of civilizations), the present, and the future (the events of Revelation) all meet.

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